Regulations

Chicago Puts Party Buses On Santa's Naughty List

Posted on December 11, 2018
The party isn’t exactly over for party buses once condemned by aldermen as “rolling cemeteries.” But the multi-pronged crackdown seems to be working. (LCT file photo)

The party isn’t exactly over for party buses once condemned by aldermen as “rolling cemeteries.” But the multi-pronged crackdown seems to be working. (LCT file photo)

As holiday party season kicks into full gear, Chicago is continuing to tighten the regulatory noose against party bus operators accused of violating rules aimed at reining in rowdyism and violence.

Since Jan. 1, 385 citations and 22 “cease and desist” orders have been issued against party bus operators. The crackdown has triggered $300,070 in penalties against operators accused of violating the city’s rigid rules.

Chicago Sun-Times article here

Related LCT article: Strict Rules Snag Motorcoach Operators

Related article: Chicago Claims Party Bus Crackdown Reduces Crimes

Related Topics: Chicago operators, criminal incidents, drunk passengers, fatalities, illegal operators, law enforcement, motorcoach operators, party buses, regulatory enforcement

Comments ( 1 )
  • VT

     | about 10 months ago

    Welcome to Chicago, the land of tax, penalties, parking tickets, red light tickets and much more!!! It's not about safety! It's about this $300k collected short to the broken corrupt system. Once you pay for $4,000-10,000 fine per violation, party bus operators need to purchase $500 charter sticker required for all party buses on top of licensed body guards and surveillance. Guess What, There will be no party buses in Chicago anymore. The real loosers are Chicagoland customers who have to pay more for service or not use any busses. It's another hidden tax! Hey, put a $500 sticker on uber/lyft 100k+ cars and this will level the plainfield!

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