Operations

Data Doesn’t Lie: How To Run Smarter

Lexi Tucker
Posted on January 17, 2018

All Star Limousine Service’s CEO Jim Powers
All Star Limousine Service’s CEO Jim Powers
LINDENHURST, N.Y. — You don’t have to be a tech wiz to figure out what your clients really want — you just have to implement them properly and act on the information you collect. All Star Limousine Service’s CEO Jim Powers and Sales and Marketing Manager Jarrad Kulick believe in the power of data and have used the feedback to save money and retain clients.

Tracking Trends

The company strives to stay on the cusp of trends…which, as many operators know, change often. “We put a lot of effort into that and try to make sure our numbers are as accurate as possible,” says Kulick.

“Part of this is knowing what you are going after,” Powers says. The company has always leaned more toward the corporate side of business, and started with a mostly black fleet. It diversified into other vehicles, but wanted to make sure they didn’t spend money on cars that weren’t going to roll.

“You have to know your market. Go to Shows and speak to people; this is how you get an education and understand the pulse of the industry.” The company is A and B testing the new Volvo S90 to see how clients like it. They then ask for feedback. “[The clients] are the ones who run the business. We can like what we like, but that’s not going to matter if the clients don’t like it. Vehicles are too expensive to make a wrong move,” Powers says.

All Star Limousine Service’s Sales and Marketing Manager Jarrad Kulick
All Star Limousine Service’s Sales and Marketing Manager Jarrad Kulick
Evolving Over Time

Powers started as a part-time chauffeur as he was going through college in 1984, and met many interesting people over a year. After developing a customer base, he leased his first stretch limo through connections he had made networking. Since 1985, he’s run a 24/7 business and has never used a phone answering service.

“That’s what separated us from those who did it part-time or didn’t take it as seriously,” Powers says. “People make changes and cancel; it’s the nature of the business. If you aren’t able to take care of those needs, they move on to someone else.”

The company has 116 vehicles serving corporate and leisure travelers, as well as clients looking for vintage vehicles. His fleet includes a mix of Lincoln Continentals, Navigators, and MKTs; Cadillac Escalades; Mercedes-Benz Sprinters; party buses; shuttle buses; 57 passenger motorcoach buses; and classic and modern Rolls Royces.

Maintaining A Reputation

Beyond data, you have to keep your integrity intact, Kulick says. “Follow through, do what you say you’ll do, and surround yourself with people who have that same set of values. There’s so much trust involved in this business. Don’t sacrifice your morals while you try to make money; do the right thing for your customers and staff.”

“At the end of the day, all you have is your name,” Powers adds.

This mentality has helped their operation grow. They started their affiliate program 10 years ago, which has since taken them over the top. “My advice is to find companies that mirror your own; this goes for their dispatch, vehicles, tech, insurance, and a number of other things. It’s more in depth than just sending someone a job,” Powers says.

In the future, the company plans to start satellite offices in two cities to diversify out of the New York area into different U.S. cities. “It’s a big step, but we’re excited about it. We are crossing T’s and dotting I’s so we can hit the ground running.”

Related Topics: business management, customer service, New York operators, research and trends, Volvo, Volvo S90, WebXclusive

Lexi Tucker Assistant Editor
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