Regulations

NYC Wheelchair Rule Unites Opposition From For-Hire Industry

Posted on August 18, 2017
An MV-1 van used for paratransit transportation. Executives from a group that includes Uber, Lyft, Via, Carmel, the Limo Association of New York and the Livery Roundtable, have been meeting weekly to hash out a framework for an alternative to the TLC proposal, which would require 25% of for-hire-vehicle operators' trips be in wheelchair-accessible vehicles.  (Creative Commons photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority via Flickr.com)
An MV-1 van used for paratransit transportation. Executives from a group that includes Uber, Lyft, Via, Carmel, the Limo Association of New York and the Livery Roundtable, have been meeting weekly to hash out a framework for an alternative to the TLC proposal, which would require 25% of for-hire-vehicle operators' trips be in wheelchair-accessible vehicles.  (Creative Commons photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority via Flickr.com)

NEW YORK --- The Taxi and Limousine Commission has done something industry observers considered impossible: It's gotten ride-hail companies, corporate limo providers and liveries on the same page. Literally.

Eight operators and trade groups have sent the agency a letter outlining their "united opposition" to proposed requirements for wheelchair-accessible service.

Together the group comprises the entire sector of for-hire-vehicle operators, who pick up passengers through app requests or phone calls, not street hails.

Crain's New York Business article here

Related Topics: ADA vehicles, black car market, Lyft, New York City, New York operators, New York Taxi & Limousine Commission, taxis, TNCs, Uber

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