Regulations

Uber Drivers Rebuke Attorney For Settling Class Action Suit

Posted on May 13, 2016

Some Uber Technologies Inc. drivers, unhappy with the company’s $100 million offer to settle claims it exploits them, are trying to get their lawyer removed with help from a competing attorney as a judge weighs the deal.

By not providing California and Massachusetts drivers the employee status they sought and paying them less than 10 percent of the value of their claims, the class-action settlement announced last month amounts to a sell-out by their attorney, Shannon Liss-Riordan, according to Hunter Shkolnik, a New York lawyer who’s pursuing his own cases against the ride-share service. Liss-Riordan’s firm, which stands to get as much as $25 million from the deal, was motivated by greed, Shkolnik and other lawyers said Thursday in a court filing.

Liss-Riordan said she did the best she could in a hard-fought and risky case to get a fair settlement for the drivers, which she said by some measurements amounts to almost a third of the damages they could have won if the case had gone to trial.

“It is easy for others to come in and second guess, but cases are settled all the time, and it is the lawyer’s duty to assess and balance the risks and make recommendations,” she said in an e-mailed statement.

Bloomberg News article here

Related Topics: California operators, driver pay, employee vs independent contractor, lawsuits, legal counsel, legal issues, Shannon Liss-Riordan, TNCs, Uber, wage lawsuits

Comments ( 2 )
  • anthony

     | about 2 years ago

    The lawyer was quick to get a settlement and it should have gone to trial. Uber is a failed business with over 400 million dollar loss in the usa and 1.4 billion world wide for 2015. I am trully surpriced that these tech guys did not understand the pricing and costs for transportation, the same business plan was used for 2012 guber jets= just closed down for good. Go back to finance school uber executives and learn pricing/costs/expenses/taxes/revenue

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