Regulations

PRLA Supports $11.4 Million Fine Against Uber

Tom Halligan
Posted on May 6, 2016
HARRISBURG, Pa. – The Philadelphia Regional Limousine Association (PRLA) supports a record-setting $11.4 million fine against Uber that Pensylvania Gov. Tom Wolf and Pittsburgh-area officials want Pennsylvania regulators to greatly reduce.

The Public Utility Commission fined Uber last month for operating six months in 2014 without the required approval.

The company has said it would appeal and was "shocked" by the fine. Uber said no one was harmed and Pennsylvania has since approved its operation.

“Uber says ‘No one was harmed.’  Does that mean we don’t need auto insurance if there isn’t an accident?  What kind of statement is that?” said PRLA Director, Anthony Onorata, (Anthony Limousine, Allentown). “If you break the law, you pay the fine/consequences."

"The fine is relevant to the size and volume of work that comes throughout the state from Uber. Besides, the fine was already lowered from $50 million to $11.4 million. Bottom line — they must follow the current laws, rules and regulations.” 

A bill is circulating through the state legislature that could give the green light to make TNCs legal statewide.

Philly.com article here

Related Topics: law enforcement, legislation, Pennsylvania operators, Philadelphia Regional Limousine Association, prla, regulatory enforcement, TNCs, Uber

Comments ( 3 )
  • John

     | about 2 years ago

    That's great news. Now lets take a look and figure out how to stop the thousands and thousands of Uber drivers who make side transportation deals. They are not logged in, and operating outside of the Uber network. They are hauling passengers on wine tours, and other afternoon-long or evening-long excursions, well beyond the bounds of Uber's insurance coverage, and obviously beyond the personal coverage on their vehicle!

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