Vehicles

Stoplights Not Needed In A World With Self-Driving Cars

Posted on March 22, 2016

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology imagined a scenario where cars communicate with each other using sensors. The sensors can tell the cars how far to stay away from one another while on the road.

The study outlines a mathematical model similar to how people board airplanes to illustrate how cars have their own "slot" on the road, much like how each passenger belongs to a boarding zone.

A steady flow at a slower rate could allow drivers to get to their destinations quicker and relieve bottleneck situations at a stoplight.

But this means controlling the speed of cars and how they group up at intersections.

A co-author of the study suggests by decreasing the speed of a car before the intersection, it would line up with its "slot," and cars would be able to pass through intersections without having to stop.

Newsy article here

Related Topics: autonomous vehicles, driverless cars, research and trends, self-driving vehicles, technology, traffic assessment technology, vehicle technology

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