Operations

Driver Arraigned in Massachusetts Charter Bus Crash

Posted on June 5, 2013

BOSTON, Mass. — Charter bus driver Samuel Jackson pleaded not guilty Tuesday to negligent driving charges from a crash in February, where the bus he was driving plowed into an overpass on Soldiers Field Road and continued forward another 500 feet after the initial impact.

Jackson was driving a group of Pennsylvania teenagers home after a visit to Harvard University through a group that works with at-risk youth.

The accident injured 35 passengers and left one teenager paralyzed.

Authorities say Jackson entered Soldiers Field Road from the Anderson Memorial Bridge, which connects Allston and Cambridge, despite several signs warning that buses and trucks are not allowed on the roadway.

The owner of Calvary Coach, Ray Talmadge, could not be reached for comment. On the night of the crash he told the Boston Globe that Jackson had worked for the company for many years and described him as a “very, very good driver.”

Full story at the Boston Globe.

Related Topics: accidents, Boston operators, bus crash, charter and tour

Comments ( 1 )
  • stewart

     | about 5 years ago

    As a driver who has driven coast to coast, I do have to say that the east coast in particular has serious issues with restricted roadways due to outdated infrastructure. And, it seeems to me that what is being done about it is, signs, and not much else. In NYC for example how many times does the morning news traffic report an errant truck driver that turned on to a roadway that he cannot clear? I do recall a few years ago a town in England had the same issues with over size vehicles following a GPS and became land;ocked and that heavy cranes were called in to lift tour buses out. "The tiny village of Barrow Gurney, England, has asked GPS map publisher Tele Atlas to remove them from the company's maps. The reason: truck drivers using GPS navigation devices are being directed to drive through the town despite the roads being too narrow for sidewalks, which has led to numerous accidents. At the root of the problem lies the fact that the navigation maps used by trucks are the same as those used by passenger cars, and they don't contain data on road width or no-truck zones. Tele Atlas says they will release truck-appropriate databases at some point, but until then they advise local governments to make use of a technology dating back to the Romans: road signs."

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