Regulations

New York Sales Tax Repeal Moving Forward With Industry Momentum

Posted on May 30, 2013

ALBANY, N.Y. — The proposed Senate bill that would repeal tax on limo service in New York State has taken another successful step today. The bill (S4920) passed the Senate Investigations and Government Operations this morning and will now move into Finance Committee. The Senate bill was proposed by Sen. Mark Grisanti, R-60th District, while a similar bill will soon be introduced into the State Assembly by Assemblyman Dennis H. Gabryszak, D-143rd District.

“We still have a lot more work to do. . . but the efforts of everyone are showing results,” said David Bastian of Towne Livery, a member of the Limousine Bus Taxi Operators of Upstate New York, who has spearheaded the issue. “All of the phone calls, emails, news stories, I feel have helped this move along.”

Bastian urges local chauffeured transportation operators to contact members of the Senate and Assembly to voice their support for the repeal of the tax and the burden the current tax places on small businesses. The sales tax varies depending on separate county add-ons. In New York City, for example, the sales tax is 8.85%.

The Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association (TLPA) also encouraged limousine and black car operators to support the sales tax repeal. In an email to members, the TLPA stated, “It's critically important for the industry to share how this tax has impacted your business…. and ask the Senators to support S4920!”

The TLPA also indicated the favorable attention the effort has gotten from organized labor. The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and the AFL-CIO both issued letters supporting the bill this week.

You can track Bill S4920 as it moves through the Senate here.

New York State Assembly Members contact info page.

New York State Senators contact info page

—    Denis Wilson, LCT East Coast Editor

Related Topics: David Bastian, LBTOUNY, legislation, New York operators, sales taxes, Towne Livery

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