Operations

NLA Underscores Rarity Of Limo Accidents Following Deadly Stretch Fire

Posted on May 5, 2013

MARLTON, N.J. — The National Limousine Association provided some informed perspective Sunday on limousine vehicle accidents as the national news media reported the details of a stretch limousine fire in San Francisco Saturday night in which five women celebrating a bachelorette outing burned to death.

Media reports of San Francisco limousine fire here.

"With regard to yesterday’s tragic limousine fire in Northern California, the National Limousine Association would like to extend our condolences to the families affected," read a statement issued by the NLA leadership. "We are not aware of the cause of the incident and will not speculate. It is unusual for limousines to be involved in this these types of accidents.  There are 110,000 chauffeured vehicles in service in the U.S. according to the limousine industry trade magazine, Limousine, Charter and Tour (LCT). They make thousands upon thousands of trips per year. Incidents like this are truly an anomaly. Our industry, through the National Limousine Association educational programs, regularly participates in safety training and our national trade shows. We will continue to monitor the situation and provide statements when necessary."

In its longstanding coverage and research of the global limousine industry, LCT Magazine can report that thousands of limousine services nationwide operate vehicles of many makes, models and model years that are properly maintained and mechanically sound. Limo vehicle accidents are highly unlikely if limousine operators: 1) Maintain vehicles in good condition; 2) Legally register their companies with state and/or local regulating agencies; 3) Keep their fleets and chauffeurs properly licensed; 4) Follow all transportation- and traffic-related laws and rules; 5) Insure all vehicles with recommended liability coverages; 6) Abide by established maintenance, safety and training programs, policies, and procedures.

The San Francisco Chronicle (SFGate.com) reported Sunday that the limo was owned by Limo Stop Inc. Its owner, Kultar Singh, told the newspaper Sunday, "I'm very, very saddened" by the accident, but declined to comment further about what happened. Singh said he has owned Limo Stop for about seven years. State records show that the company's license is valid and up to date. The white stretch limousine was a 1999 Lincoln Town Car model.

-- Martin Romjue, LCT editor




Related Topics: accidents, California operators, limousine fires, National Limousine Association, passenger safety, vehicle safety

Comments ( 1 )
  • anthony

     | about 4 years ago

    1999 limousine????? How many miles did the vehicle have??? I dont agree with the chp investigation about the air bags....rear bearings can wear out and cause an oil leak that can ignite with the friction of the rear wheels turning. It cost about 900.00 to replace the rear wheel bearings.....most owners dont replace them untill the drivers report a burning oil smell... Its such a shame that lives where lost and the driver did not appear to know the ins and outs about driving people..... he did not stop and lost precious time for all the passengers to get out of the limousine. This is another horrific accident to add to the many all over the usa. The laws need to be changed.......age limit on limousines and party buses. I am tired of reading about people dying in a limousine or party bus.....it should not be happening

More Stories
Article

How To Get Clients To See Value In Your Rates

NOV. LCT: We fear our own prices when comparing ourselves to TNCs, but we don’t compete with them any more than Marriott does with a Motel 6. Learn how to justify your rates without guilt.

News

2018's Luxury Travel Trends

Among the highlights for next year is a focus on far-flung destinations along with international trips of two weeks or more.