Regulations

Feds Start Two-Month Regulatory Motorcoach Crackdown

Posted on February 27, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Transportation will launch in March a two-month long blitz of investigations into motorcoach companies.

The blitz will target up to 200 companies that have safety lapses similar to those involved in two recent fatal accidents. About 400 federal and state specially trained inspectors and auditors will conduct longer and more complete inspections and maintenance reviews.

In addition, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration is asking all state and local police agencies to boost enforcement of traffic-law violations by interstate bus drivers, including speeding, tailgating, texting, impaired driving and unsafe lane changing.

In a sign of solidarity with the Department of Transportation, American Bus Association president and CEO Peter Pantuso has asked ABA’s motorcoach operator members to help identify motorcoach companies that are operating illegally or unsafely. The ABA knows operators have first-hand knowledge of which companies routinely operate unsafely.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood emphasizes that if the DOT learns of companies with questionable practices, the agency will investigate those companies immediately.

“If you see a motorcoach operating in an unsafe manner or if you know of a company that is operating illegally or not domiciled where they claim to be, now is the time to get that information to the U.S. Department of Transportation,” the ABA said in a press release.

The DOT hotline for anonymous reporting of unsafe carriers is 1-888-368-7238. You also can report suspected violations online at http://nccdb.fmcsa.dot.gov/

SOURCE: American Bus Association

Related Topics: American Bus Association, bus regulations, DOT issues, FMCSA, illegal operators, motorcoaches, regulatory enforcement

Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
(LCT image)
Article

How To Keep Up With Labor Laws

SEPT. LCT: Complying with labor laws meant to protect employees gets tough since drivers can’t pull over and take a 30-minute break.