Regulations

Association Get Permits Flowing Again At LAX

Posted on August 15, 2012
ITS executive chauffeur Rupert (L) gets some help from LAX Landside Operations employee Tony on Aug. 11, 2012 in adding LAX livery access decals for ITS' fleet of new 2013 Cadillac XTS sedans. The GCLA worked with airport officials to relieve a backlog of permits needed for limousine vehicles to legally access LAX.

ITS executive chauffeur Rupert (L) gets some help from LAX Landside Operations employee Tony on Aug. 11, 2012 in adding LAX livery access decals for ITS' fleet of new 2013 Cadillac XTS sedans. The GCLA worked with airport officials to relieve a backlog of permits needed for limousine vehicles to legally access LAX.

ITS executive chauffeur Rupert (L) gets some help from LAX Landside Operations employee Tony on Aug. 11, 2012 in adding LAX livery access decals for ITS' fleet of new 2013 Cadillac XTS sedans. The GCLA worked with airport officials to relieve a backlog of permits needed for limousine vehicles to legally access LAX.
ITS executive chauffeur Rupert (L) gets some help from LAX Landside Operations employee Tony on Aug. 11, 2012 in adding LAX livery access decals for ITS' fleet of new 2013 Cadillac XTS sedans. The GCLA worked with airport officials to relieve a backlog of permits needed for limousine vehicles to legally access LAX.

LOS ANGELES — Members of the Greater California Livery Association achieved a breakthrough last week in getting limo/livery decals issued once again for operators serving the Los Angeles International Airport.

Some operators had been waiting since March to get their decals which enable them to pick-up and drop off at LAX. Multiple Southern California chauffeured transportation companies were losing revenue because they could not legally use their vehicles at LAX without permits. Most limo operations in Southern California need vehicle access at LAX given the high volume of ground transportation business the airport generates. About two-thirds of all charter-party carriers registered with the California Public Utilities Commission are based in the Southern California region.

Last week, GCLA President Mark Stewart, and GCLA vendor board member Steve Wood of South Bay Ford talked with a high-ranking administrator at LAX Landside Operations about the problem. The administrator was surprised to hear of the extent of the backlog and immediately acted to resolve it.

LAX Landside Operations started issuing permits again on Saturday, Aug. 11. One of the many companies to benefit was ITS of Los Angeles, which recently received a fleet of six 2013 Cadillac XTS sedans, the first ones in the Los Angeles market. Until Saturday, ITS had not been able to deliver and pick up LAX clients in the XTS sedans.

ITS chauffeurs await new permits for a fleet of new Cadillac XTS sedans on Aug. 11, 2012 at LAX, the first day since March that the airport started issuing limousine/livery vehicle access permits to operate after a delay in the process.
ITS chauffeurs await new permits for a fleet of new Cadillac XTS sedans on Aug. 11, 2012 at LAX, the first day since March that the airport started issuing limousine/livery vehicle access permits to operate after a delay in the process.

GCLA leaders are looking at constructive ways to hold airport and city officials more accountable and make them more aware of chauffeured transportation challenges so similar bureaucratic snafus do not occur in the future. Stewart and GCLA consultant Paul Haney have a meeting scheduled with LAX Landside Operations on Sept. 10 to address operator concerns.

Related: The GCLA is holding its biggest event of the year, the annual GCLA Expo, on Wednesday, Sept. 19 in Costa Mesa, Calif., which will feature extensive limousine and livery vehicle exhibits.

— Martin Romjue, LCT editor

Related Topics: airport fees, airport rules, airports, California operators, Greater California Livery Association, LAX, limo licenses

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