Regulations

Fingerprint Fight Betrays Uber's True Motives

Posted on September 30, 2015

TOP STORY: BOSTON -- Uber is fighting back against lawmakers who want to implement fingerprint checks on its drivers, sparking a debate over to what degree drivers should be vetted before joining the ride-hailing service’s massive fleet.

Boston.com article here


Big Strike 1 For Uber Drivers? 
Thousands of Uber drivers for the transportation network company service nationwide plan to strike come mid-October.

They’re demanding fewer drivers, higher rates and an option to tip. KHOU-TV.com article here

Uber Faces Massive Crackdown In London: Transport for London is preparing to launch a crackdown on Uber, proposing a series of new rules that will hit the popular minicab-hailing app in one of its most popular cities. London Telegraph article here

Europe Proves To Be A Bad Zone For Uber: The ride-hailing app's offices in Amsterdam were raided by the Dutch authorities, two of its top executives appeared in court in Paris on Tuesday and proposals that Uber is unhappy about were published on Wednesday by London's transport rule-setting body. CNBC article and video here

Ohio Legislators Seek State Rules On Uber: Not even a week after Uber announced a plan to expand its service in Ohio by 10,000 drivers, legislators in the state House made the case for expanded regulation of the popular app-based ride service. Columbus Dispatch article here


Will China Be Uber's Waterloo?
Stiff competition has forced the TNC to adapt in order to survive in a new market. 

China has proven a humbling speed bump in Uber’s quest to dominate the mobilized sharing economy worldwide. Fortune Magazine article here

Related Topics: China operators, driver behavior, employee vs independent contractor, European operators, Houston operators, labor laws, law enforcement, Massachusetts operators, Ohio operators, regulatory enforcement, state regulations, TNCs, Uber

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