Operations

Homeland Security Tips Highlight New Jersey Meeting

Tom Halligan
Posted on September 18, 2015
Craig Sante of the New Jersey Office of  Homeland Security and Preparedness addresses LANJ members Wednesday on how limousine companies can help report signs of terrorism activity.

Craig Sante of the New Jersey Office of  Homeland Security and Preparedness addresses LANJ members Wednesday on how limousine companies can help report signs of terrorism activity.

Craig Sante of the New Jersey Office of  Homeland Security and Preparedness addresses LANJ members Wednesday on how limousine companies can help report signs of terrorism activity.
Craig Sante of the New Jersey Office of  Homeland Security and Preparedness addresses LANJ members Wednesday on how limousine companies can help report signs of terrorism activity.

PRINCETON, N.J.— Gearing up to take on illegal TNCs this fall led the agenda at the Sept. 16 luncheon meeting of the Limousine Association of New Jersey (LANJ). LANJ President Jeff Shanker (A-1 Limousine, Princeton) told more than 50 members and guests that following the summer legislative recess, LANJ will “be back in full force grass roots efforts” to lobby state Senate and Assembly legislators to counter illegal TNCs operating throughout the state.

In other business, Shanker said LANJ will host a Technology Symposium Wednesday, Sept. 30, where various technology companies will demo their products to the LANJ Executive Board to educate the board so it can conduct analysis and recommend technologies that can help LANJ operators run their businesses more efficiently and counter competition from TNC on-demand mobile apps.             

The meeting also featured a presentation on how limousine companies can help report suspicious activity to authorities. Craig Sante, an intelligence analyst with the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, told members they can act as the eyes and ears on potential terrorists by looking for the “8 Signs of Terrorism.”

Surveillance: The first sign of terrorism is someone trying to monitor or record activities. “If terrorists are targeting a specific area, they will most likely be observed in that location during the planning phase,” Sante said.

Elicitation/Seeking Information: The second sign is an attempt by a terrorist to gain information through inquiries about a person, place or operation. “Terrorists may attempt to research a bridge and tunnel ton use, make unusual inquiries concerning shipments or look into how a facility operates,” he noted.

Tests of Security: A terrorist may test security or probe a site to use to gather data. Vehicle sparked for unusually long periods of time, sometimes in a no-parking zones, are another test of security.

Acquiring Supplies: Look for any suspicious people trying to acquire, steal or transport explosives, weapons or ammunition, fertilizer or harmful chemicals.

Suspicious People: Observe suspicious people who do not belong. “The suspicious person could be anyone in a building, neighborhood, or business establishment who seem out of place because of their demeanor or who asks unusual questions," Sante said.

Dry Run: A dry run may be the heart of an attack’s planning stage which is especially true for kidnappings and bombings

Deploying Assets: Look for someone deploying assets or getting into position. “This is your last chance to alert authorities before a terrorist act occurs," he added.

Terrorism Funding: Terrorists use a variety of methods to raise launder and transport funds. Be alert for suspicious credit cards spending, multiple surnames at the same address or illegal drugs.

Related Topics: Jeff Shanker, LANJ, legislation, limo associations, Limousine Association of New Jersey, new jersey, New Jersey operators, security, state regulations, TNCs

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