Industry Research

Study Shows Open Skies Could Boost Travel Economy

Posted on July 2, 2015
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Two international aviation agreements targeted for "freezing" by major U.S. airlines annually support billions in economic activity and tax revenue and tens of thousands of jobs, according to new research by Oxford Economics commissioned by the U.S. Travel Association.

Moreover, the study measured the considerable fiscal benefit the Big Three U.S. airlines— American, Delta and United — enjoy themselves because of the existence of Open Skies agreements.

Open Skies treaties — essentially free trade agreements for international passenger aviation routes — have come under fire from the Big Three because they claim certain international airlines are encroaching on their market share.

U.S. Travel has vehemently opposed the move to undermine Open Skies on the grounds that the 100-plus agreements, the first of which were signed in the early 1990s, have been a colossal boon to the overall U.S. economy. On June 18, U.S. Travel unveiled the new research to verify its position.

U.S. Travel press release here

Oxford Economics/U.S. Travel research analysis report here

Related Topics: airlines, airports, business travel, corporate travel, FBO market, Global operators, international, international business, leisure travel, U.S. Travel Association

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