Regulations

Massachusetts Town Orders TNCs To Cease And Desist

Tom Halligan
Posted on April 15, 2015

BOSTON, Mass. — The town of Braintree Board of License Commissioners voted 5-0 April 14 to issue a cease and desist order for TNCs that have not obtained either a hackney or livery license.

The order stems following a board review of the town’s regulatory ordinances which the board determined that the TNCs violated.

Town Solicitor Peter Morin informed the Board that they were well within their rights to require Uber and others to apply for either a taxi or livery license, and issue a cease and desist order until such time as they do so.

“The Massachusetts Regional Taxi Advocacy Group (MRTA) applauds the (decision) requiring Uber and others to register as either a taxi service or livery service,” said MRTA spokesman Stephen Regan. “We have been stating all along that just because Uber says they are not a taxi or livery service doesn’t make it so. In all 351 cities and towns in Massachusetts if you offer rides for a fee then you must be licensed, permitted, or registered as a livery or taxi. It’s the law and everyone must obey it.”

The MRTA is a statewide coalition of taxi and livery owners. managers, and drivers, as well as organizations and businesses advocating for consumers,public safety, elderly, insurance and banking interest, women rights, and equality.

In a statement, the MRTA said: “Hopefully this action will spur other municipalities to stand up to the illegal tactics employed by Uber that place drivers onto the streets who lack appropriate insurance, properly inspected vehicles, driver background checks, and appropriate licensure to conduct ride for hire services. This message of follow the law or we will shut you down is overdue but most welcome.”

 

Related Topics: limo tradeshows, MASSACHUSETTS, Massachusetts operators, TNCs

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