Regulations

Fight Vehicle Fires With New Suppression System

LCT Staff
Posted on May 25, 2011

The FireCaddy is available for aftermarket installations on all brands of motorcoach models, and full-fleet installations receive a special discount.

SCHAUMBURG, Ill. — MOTOR COACH INDUSTRIES has made an exclusive long-term agreement with Just-in Case Fire Ltd. (JICF) to equip its motorcoaches with the FIRECADDY FIRE-SUPRESSION SYSTEM within North America.

The FireCaddy fire-suppression system, installed in the coach baggage bay, is designed for on-the-spot fire-fighting capabilities, allowing a driver or individual to extinguish a threatening fire before emergency help arrives. The system comes with a handheld hose to combat engine fires, tire fires and interior fires safely and effectively.

MCI Service Parts is making the system available immediately for aftermarket installations on all brands of motorcoach models, and is offering special discounted pricing for full-fleet installations. MCI showcased the system in January at the UMA Expo in Tampa, Fla.

"Ensuring passenger safety is our top priority,” said Bryan Couch, MCI vice president and general manager of operations. “The FireCaddy fire-suppression system offers hand-held fire-fighting capabilities that assist drivers before professional firefighters arrive.”

Colin Patterson, president of Just-In Case Fire Ltd, said, "This new technology will allow motorcoach operators across North America to provide enhanced operational safety, not only in new coaches, but those in operation as well."

Just-In Case Fire Ltd is based in Calgary, Alberta, and designs, manufactures, markets and distributes innovative, foam-induced, portable fire suppression equipment under the brand FIRECADDY along with environmentally-friendly certified fire-fighting foam called FLAMEOUT.

Source: MOTOR COACH INDUSTRIES

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