Regulations

Federal Sweep Takes 109 Buses, Trucks Off Roads

LCT Staff
Posted on August 25, 2010

Apprehended drivers face possible fines and being barred from operating a commercial vehicle for failing to adhere to federal drug and alcohol regulations.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — One-hundred nine commercial bus and truck drivers were removed from the roads and more than 175 carriers face enforcement actions as a result of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's (FMCSA) annual drug and alcohol strike force sweep June 21 to July 2, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said last week.

"If you are a commercial driver or carrier operating in violation of federal drug and alcohol laws, we will remove you from our roadways," LaHood said in a statement. "Parents deserve to know their children are being driven by bus drivers who are drug and alcohol free, and every motorist deserves to feel confident that the drivers of large trucks and buses are safe and sober."

During the two-week sweep, FMCSA strike force investigators examined the drug and alcohol safety records of commercial drivers employed by bus and truck companies, including school bus drivers, interstate passenger carriers, hazardous material transporters, and general freight long-haul trucking companies. The goals were to identify motor carriers who were violating federal drug and alcohol testing requirements and to remove from the road commercial truck and bus drivers who jump from carrier to carrier to evade federal drug and alcohol testing and reporting requirements.

"Our annual drug and alcohol strike force is just one of the ways we weed out those 'bad actors' and make our roads safer for everyone," said FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro in a statement.

The 109 commercial drivers identified in the sweep face possible fines and being barred from operating a commercial motor vehicle. Additionally, 175 commercial carriers face pending enforcement actions for violations, such as using a driver who has tested positive for illegal drugs and for not instituting a drug and alcohol testing program. Drivers and carriers will have an opportunity to contest the alleged violations and the amount of the civil penalties.

Source: FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

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