Regulations

NELA Stays On Top of Multiple State Laws In the Works

LCT Staff
Posted on April 1, 2009

DURHAM, N.H. — The New England Livery Association NELA is working on a number of legislative issues in all of the states that the association covers. Below is an update of the legislative initiatives in each of the states:

RHODE ISLAND

Proposed legislation would affect livery companies stating that they may not accept a telephone or other electronic solicitation for service within a three-hour window unless such service is part of a written contract. NELA has submitted a written response and request for a meeting.

MASSACHUSETTS

Legislators acted to delay MassPike March 29 toll hikes while they work out a solution to the state's transportation problems. The Senate will vote on a package of changes to the transportation system next week.

NELA continues to work with DPU regarding language defining livery and with legislators on driver safety issues. NELA has sent letters to all 20 members of the Transportation Commitee in Massachusetts to fight the proposed increase in tolls and an increase in the gas tax. They have written to Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., about proposed legislation that would hinder business from coming to the state. NELA members have been sent the letter to put on their own letterhead and mail out.

CONNECTICUT

Bill No. 152 effective 10/1/2009 that prohibits open alcoholic beverage containers in motor vehicles includes the livery exclusion, section 5c, requested by NELA affecting livery businesses.

NELA continues to work with the Connecticut Department of Transportation on livery regulations and with legislators on new efforts by the state to regulate vehicle safety and economics of the industry. NELA has stated that a new report was written to target taxis, and livery was added as an afterthought. The association is requesting the agency eliminate livery entirely from two new bills.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

A bill to make it illegal for drivers to send text messages on cell phones or type on laptop computers or other electronic devices was approved by the House and is on its way to the Senate.

Source: Linda Moore, LCT Magazine

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