Operations

N.Y. Governor Signs Seat Belt Measure

LCT Staff
Posted on January 6, 2004

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York Gov. George Pataki signed a bill mandating that livery vehicles and taxis registered in the state must have a written notice in them urging passengers to “Please Buckle Up.” The measure, which goes into effect in February, also requires that seat belts must be in working order and easily accessible to passengers.

The new law does not mandate the size of the sign, but states that it must be “legible and conspicuous to passengers in all seating positions of such vehicles.”

Mike Rice, executive vice president of Tran-Star Executive Transportation Services in North Babylon, N.Y., said the new law does not directly change Tran-Star’s policy.

The company was already pushing passenger seatbelt use when training its chauffeurs. It also has been posting a small “buckle up” notice inside its vehicles. Despite the signs taking away from the sleek look of limousines and sedans, Rice said he supported the measure.

”[The law] truly makes sense,” Rice said. “It’s proven that seatbelts save lives.”

He also suggested that the new law may help the industry with insurance if passengers follow the advice of the signs and buckle up, thereby potentially reducing accident injury claims.

- Alisha Gomez

LCT Staff LCT Staff
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