Operations

Limousine Operators Worried About Disruption in Air Travel

LCT Staff
Posted on August 16, 2006

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — The specter of 9-11 is haunting people in the limousine industry whose livelihoods depend on people flying for business and leisure. "We were almost out of business in one day after 9-11," said John Nyikos, president of Leros Point to Point, a Hawthorne-based company he runs with his two sons. "My kids learned a valuable lesson at an early age — to never take the business for granted."

Nyikos' concerns are being echoed by his colleagues throughout the Lower Hudson Valley. They fear that families and corporations will cut back on travel following the news of a foiled plot to blow up commercial jetliners flying from Britain to the U.S. "If it keeps proceeding like this, people are going to want to travel less and less, and you can't blame them," said Denise Casella, an accounting manager for LimousinesWorldwide.com, based in Mount Vernon. "We depend on the (airlines) — 80% of our pick-ups are doing airports." Also, like Leros, her business networks with limousine companies internationally to arrange pick-up at passengers' destination airports. That means business is lost in more than one location when passengers decide not to fly.

Source: The Journal News

LCT Staff LCT Staff
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