Operations

Police Sting Phony Limousine Service

LCT Staff
Posted on July 6, 2005

PLAINFIELD, CONN. – Police and a Department of Transportation investigator went undercover recently to nab a Plainfield man police said was operating an unlicensed limousine service.

Police said they received a complaint in early April of an unlicensed limousine service operating in the town. Working with Department of Transportation officer Kenneth Davidson, police were able to determine that the driver did not have the required licensing but was allegedly hiring out as a livery service.

Davidson, without disclosing his true identity, called the service and learned it would cost $500 for a limousine ride to Boston for a night of drinking and bar-hopping. Arrangements were made to pick up Davidson and two "friends," both Plainfield police officers, at a commuter lot.

Police said when the driver arrived at the designated time, he accepted payment for his services. When the men asked to see his state-issued livery service permit, he could not produce it. His privately owned limousine did not have livery service license plates, but bore a combination registration plate issued by the state Department of Motor Vehicles.

He was charged with operating a livery service without a permit, as well as operating without public service liability insurance, operating without intrastate livery plates and operating without public service endorsements. He was released on a $1,000 non-surety bond pending his appearance in Danielson Superior Court.

State Department of Transportation spokesman Dennis King said there is a danger associated with using unlicensed livery services. They usually do not have the required insurance and their vehicles are not inspected for safety.

LCT Staff LCT Staff
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