Operations

Chauffeur Leaves Limo Unattended & Open to Theft

LCT Staff
Posted on April 2, 2008

TORONTO — Georgio Crikkas, owner of a limousine company that boasts two stretch Hummers, said he'd fire any driver stupid enough to leave a car unattended, keys in the ignition, and just begging to be stolen and taken for a joyride. The proprietor of 123limo.ca said he and other limo service owners were shocked to hear that a woman climbed into a stretch Hummer that had been left running on a downtown corner while the driver took a bathroom break.

The woman commandeered the monolithic luxury car, which according to Crikkas could be worth $200,000, and took it on a wild, dangerous ride. Police said she struck another woman, a hydro pole, a house and three other vehicles.

Around 1:00 a.m. a limousine driver left his car unattended near Yonge and Wellesley Sts., with the keys in the ignition and passengers in the back, while he ran to the bathroom, police said. In the time he was gone, a woman asked the passengers if they'd let her come in. When they refused, the woman hopped into the driver's seat, prompting the passengers to scurry out.

The only victim, another woman, suffered minor injuries. Diane Hancox, 20, of Calgary, faces 10 charges in connection with the incident, including theft over $5,000, possession of stolen property, and dangerous driving.

Source: Toronto Star

LCT Staff LCT Staff
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