Operations

New York City Congestion Pricing Program Shelved

LCT Staff
Posted on July 18, 2007

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York Lawmakers on Monday shelved Mayor Michael Bloomberg's plan to charge a fee to drivers entering the busiest parts of Manhattan, dealing a setback to the mayor as he tries to raise his national profile and promote his environmental initiatives. The State Senate, which had convened in a special session, adjourned without taking up the plan after it became apparent that the votes for passage were not there.

Meanwhile, the Assembly speaker, Sheldon Silver, proposed sending the issue to a study commission that would also consider other ways to reduce traffic, and giving the Legislature until next March to act.

The developments suggested that passage of the mayor's plan, or one resembling the original, was unlikely. Asked if congestion pricing was dead, Senator Martin Golden, a Brooklyn Republican who supports the plan, said, "It doesn't sound like it's alive, that's for sure."

Mr. Bloomberg had lobbied hard and backed an extensive publicity campaign to pressure lawmakers to approve his plan by Monday, the deadline for the city to seek as much as $500 million in federal aid. But legislators complained that he had failed to answer basic questions about the proposal, which has never been tried on a broad scale in any American city.

Mr. Bloomberg's plan calls for imposing fees of $8 on cars and $21 on trucks that enter Manhattan below 86th Street during the workday.

Source: New York Times

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