Operations

Home-Based Service Prompts Complaints from Neighbors

LCT Staff
Posted on December 27, 2001

Since she moved into her Pittsburgh neighborhood in 1997, Marie Costanza of Costanza's Chauffeur Service has been dealing with unhappy neighbors.

Neighbors have complained to borough officials about vehicle parking on the street or lawns and noises associated with the early-morning cleaning of the vehicles.

?We moved the vehicles on Dec. 3,? Costanza said.

She explained that the parking issues had been resolved, and she promptly dismissed any noise concerns.

?When I first moved here, I called people at the borough and was told that [this business] was acceptable,? she said.

A day after the move, she received a citation from the borough's code enforcement officer that was filed Nov. 19 and is scheduled for a Jan. 14 hearing at a district justice?s office. A borough code enforcement officer said that the citation was for violation of an ordinance prohibiting any home occupation involving rental or sale of vehicles or equipment.

Council members said that they hoped that relocating the limousines would resolve this issue. Costanza said that she hoped the citation issue would be resolved to her liking. (For more on this story see the February issue of LCT.)

LCT Staff LCT Staff
Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Article

How To Get Clients To See Value In Your Rates

NOV. LCT: We fear our own prices when comparing ourselves to TNCs, but we don’t compete with them any more than Marriott does with a Motel 6. Learn how to justify your rates without guilt.

News

2018's Luxury Travel Trends

Among the highlights for next year is a focus on far-flung destinations along with international trips of two weeks or more.

Article

The Art Of Sales

NOV. LCT: In the battle to obtain new clients and retain loyal ones, only those who know the best ways to reach, connect with, and educate them will survive.

Article

How To Handle Conflicts Of Interest

NOV. LCT: Forming relationships with your customers is a vital part of retaining them. But how do you ensure you and your employees never cross the line of professionalism?