Operations

Keynote Urges NJ Operators To Obey Driver Time-Off Rules

Tom Halligan
Posted on November 5, 2014
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — Despite the fact that the private ground transportation companies have an excellent safety record, operators still need to be vigilant about safety and adhering to all rules and regulations, said Christopher Rotondo, keynote speaker at the Nov. 4 breakfast meeting of the Limousine Associations of New Jersey held during the Chauffeur Driven Show at the Taj Mahal.

Rotondo, division administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor Coach Safety Administration, told operators that “when things go bad for you, they go bad in a big way,” because of media attention whenever there is a major accident involving a motorcoach, limousine or other for-hire vehicle.

Noting that driver fatigue often is a cited as a contributing factor in accidents involving commercial drivers, Rotondo urged operators to make sure the follow the rules to the letter regarding driver time off. “If I stop a driver and he only had seven hours and forty-five minutes off duty and the law required eight hours, he is in violation. Put yourself in my shoes. Suppose I let him go and down the road he is involved in an accident. That’s why we do not cut any breaks regarding the laws,” he explained.

When questioned about TNCs, Rotondo said that if  TNC drivers violate any federal regulation, the agency goes after them like any other private transportation company.

“Look, every day 92 people are killed on U.S. highways, and 11 of those will be killed by a bus or truck, so I preach about safety in order to save lives,” he said.

Related Topics: Association News, federal regulations, James Moseley, LANJ, limo tradeshows, new jersey, New Jersey operators, regulatory enforcement, state regulations

Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Article

How To Get Clients To See Value In Your Rates

NOV. LCT: We fear our own prices when comparing ourselves to TNCs, but we don’t compete with them any more than Marriott does with a Motel 6. Learn how to justify your rates without guilt.

News

2018's Luxury Travel Trends

Among the highlights for next year is a focus on far-flung destinations along with international trips of two weeks or more.