How To Pass By An Accident Scene

Jim Luff
Posted on August 31, 2016

Traffic slowdowns can tempt drivers to gawk at whatever is around them, especially accidents (Photo from Wikipedia Commons en.wikipedia.org)
Traffic slowdowns can tempt drivers to gawk at whatever is around them, especially accidents (Photo from Wikipedia Commons en.wikipedia.org)
It's called rubbernecking. It's a part of human nature as you pass an accident scene to look and see what happened. Accidents in northbound lanes cause backups in southbound lanes, although no part of the accident has affected the southbound lanes. People apply their brakes just so they can catch a glimpse of what is going on.

Unfortunately, human curiosity and rubbernecking frequently cause secondary accidents by people simply not paying attention to their driving. In most cases, secondary accidents result from rear-end collisions in which the first driver applies his brakes for a better look and the second driver, who is also rubbernecking, fails to see the brakes applied on the vehicle ahead as he is no longer looking at the road.

Don't be a rubbernecker. Stay focused on your lane and the activities happening on the road ahead of you as well as what the driver behind you is doing. Plan your "escape path" so if the driver behind you isn't paying attention, you can veer off the shoulder or into another lane if needed to protect yourself from a rear-end collision.

Keep your eyes on the vehicle ahead of you and make sure the driver is focused on the road ahead and not the drama on the side of the road, so if he hits the car in front, you don't run into the back of him.

Related Topics: accident reduction, accidents, chauffeur behavior, chauffeur training, driver behavior, driver safety, driver training, driving gem, Jim Luff, passenger safety, Shop Talk blog, traffic jams

Jim Luff Contributing Editor
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