Slow Down To Save Lives

Jim Luff
Posted on March 11, 2015
Vehicle accidents are the number one cause of death among people between the ages of 3 and 34 in the U.S., according to the NHTSA. In fact, more than 37,000 people are killed each year in auto accidents.


Almost all auto accidents result from human error. Very few are caused by mechanical failures such as brake failures or wheel dismounts. This means you literally hold your life in your hands by the steering wheel and the actions you take with other controls such as the gas and brake pedals.

The faster you travel the more likely you are to be involved in a deadly accident. Research has shown that your likelihood of a crash increased by 5% for every mile per hour you travel. At highway speeds, the odds dramatically increase. In 2008, the NHTSA reported 31% of all fatal crashes involved speeding. 11,674 people to be exact were killed that year in speeding vehicles.

If you speed 10 mph over the speed limit, you might get to your destination a few minutes sooner but you increase your risk of a crash by 50%. Take your time. We charge our clients by the hour and we pay you by the hour. There is no reason to speed.

Related Topics: driver behavior, driver safety, driving, Jim Luff, passenger safety, Safety, Shop Talk blog

Jim Luff Contributing Editor
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