Bad Work Ethics All Too Common

Jim Luff
Posted on December 16, 2014
When I got my first "job," I worked at a radio station as an "intern" in high school. I wanted so badly to be a deejay that I would do anything. If they asked me to come in early, I did it, worked late, and did all I had to. The boss was "the boss" and you did what you were told.


Later I got a job at McDonald's. I worked as a cashier, a cook, a drive-thru attendant and a dish washer. I unloaded trucks, cleaned the dining area, and did anything else assigned to me. I thought long and hard about asking for a day off. If they needed me to stay late, I didn't even know I had an option. Of course, I probably didn't.

Last week, a chauffeur left a voicemail for me typical of the mindset of today's employee. He said he there was no heat in his apartment making it difficult for him to get ready for work as he was living in "tent-like conditions."

Because of this, he could only work two days a week because "it's such a hassle to get ready for work." He further stated that he didn't want any early morning assignments, no late night assignments, and we couldn't pay him enough to do a holiday light tour. He also said, if the run didn't pay at least $100, he had no interest in coming to work.

This is what I'm working with folks. And by the way, he is not completely unemployed!

Related Topics: chauffeur behavior, employee management, human resources, Jim Luff, Shop Talk blog

Jim Luff Contributing Editor
Comments ( 5 )
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  • Jim Luff

     | about 3 years ago

    Hey Andrew, I hear what you are saying. You were spot on with many things involving this situation. He may very well be depressed. But, he is a product of his own environment going through one living situation after another and always blaming the next move on bad roommates. He was chronically late to the point we had to lie to him about the start times to make him arrive on time. I do believe that both loyalty and excellent work warrants raises and promotions. He has been skipped over for promotions many times but for justified reasons such as being uncooperative with dispatchers. In hindsight, weeks later, I believe it was a good thing that happened for both of us. Kind of like getting a divorce when you know you should have done it years ago and you can never get that time back that you wasted in an unhappy relationship. It has been an unhappy one for far too long and I allowed loyalty to overlook a lot of bad.

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