Drunk Driving Crackdowns Benefit Chauffeured Service

LCT Magazine
Posted on July 22, 2011

It’s not uncommon for one to experience warped vision and lightheadedness after having dinner with potential or current business partners, since drinks, laughs, and negotiations go hand-in-hand most of the time. In China, it’s tradition to conduct business matters over meals accompanied by plenty of alcohol, including a sorghum-based spirit called “baijiu”, which is a staple at state banquets and family reunions.

The increasing number of cars on Chinese roads has led the government to launch a crackdown on drunk driving, and offenders can face up to six months of prison time and have their licenses revoked for five years. Last year, police caught 526,000 drunk drivers, up 68% from a year earlier, and traffic accidents rose 36 % to 3.9 million, resulting in one death every nine minutes. China’s Public Security Ministry said that more than half of road fatalities were caused by inebriated motorists.

Not surprisingly, these stringent rules have fueled demand for chauffeured transportation services. Beijing Ben Ao An Da Automobile Driving Service, which hires out chauffeurs, said it expects to boost sales by about 60% this year as a result of the tougher law, which went into effect on May 1.

Click here to read more about China's new drunk driving policies and their positive effect on chauffeured transportation.

This is also a concept that can readily be embraced by every operator in the U.S., as a recent LCT blog article on CLS Nevada's drunk driving limousine ad campaign shows. —   Michael Campos, LCT assistant editor

 

 

Related Topics: limo tradeshows, Sales & Marketing

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