How Are Airport Regulations Going in Your City?

LCT Magazine
Posted on March 25, 2008
In Los Angeles, conditions are not easy for the industry at the airport, LAX. The Greater California Livery Association (GLCA) has been communicating in detail with Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA), the organization that runs LAX. In November, GCLA submitted suggested revisions to LAWA’s Proposed Changes to the Commercial Passenger Vehicle Rules and Regulations. Airport administrators have not yet clarified the finalized rules and regulations.

For the LAX Airport, the governing organization is attempting to establish a formula for fines and suspensions assessing a point system for each infraction, according to the GCLA. Penalty points could be assessed for a number of violations including: chauffeurs stopping their vehicles at a curb longer than 45 seconds; more than one vehicle per operator stopping at a designated loading area at a single terminal; using curb coordinator staff members; and, missing the trip ticket booth. Building up violation points could lead to fines and, eventually, to a three-day suspension for accessing the airport. 

Another facet of the new, proposed rules is that $100 per vehicle transponder fees would be added for airport access. This would cost the industry an additional $1 million per year, says GCLA President Alan Shanedling.

It’s too early for LAWA to comment publicly on this situation – just that they’re reviewing it.

This dispute over airport rules and regulations is becoming more common in the chauffeured transportation industry. Association leaders have worked hard at resolving problems at Detroit Metro, Baltimore-Washington International, and other U.S. airports. The problems usually arise from increased access fees, strict limitations in curbing and parking fleet vehicles, and in where chauffeurs and curb coordinators can meet and greet clients.

Read about this in the April issue of LCT in the LimoScene department.

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