Operations

Friend Request Denied…But Why?

Lexi Tucker
Posted on September 4, 2019

Tell me who you are...it'll help.

Tell me who you are...it'll help.

I hear my phone go off, expecting to see a text from a friend, family member, or coworker, and instead I get the dreaded “[insert name here] wants to connect with you.” Normally this would be fine, except…I’ve never met said person in my life.

There’s no denying networking is vital in not just the luxury transportation industry, but any business that relies on connecting with other people (re: all of them). I’m coming up on my fourth year covering the industry next month, and there’s one issue that seems to continue to plague me: Friend requests with no form of introduction. It’s gotten so bad, I literally had to make a post about it on my LinkedIn (see photo).

Receive a friend request and can’t seem to recall a connection? It’s better to delete them. They could be scammers, malicious link posters, catfishers, or even private investigators (Source: Komando.com).

Receive a friend request and can’t seem to recall a connection? It’s better to delete them. They could be scammers, malicious link posters, catfishers, or even private investigators (Source: Komando.com).

I’d like to think I’m a friendly person and not that hard to approach. Even if I didn’t know whoever wanted to connect with me, if they were to write a short note of introduction, it might smooth out the interaction. I’ve heard it said, “people do business with those they know, like, and trust.” So, let me ask this: How can we do business with each other (in this case, have me write an article about you) if I don’t get to know you? I can see you’re an operator on your profile, but that doesn’t tell me anything about you. 

What to look out for: Limited profile history (often created only a few weeks or months ago), little to no daily activity, a small number of friends, a photo of an attractive person posing provocatively (yes, really). (Source: Komando.com)

What to look out for: Limited profile history (often created only a few weeks or months ago), little to no daily activity, a small number of friends, a photo of an attractive person posing provocatively (yes, really). (Source: Komando.com)

I like to link this back to a concept everyone in this industry can understand. When you are looking for an affiliate in a new city or country, do you just take someone’s word for it they know what they are doing and can take care of your client the same way you would? When someone posts a photo of one of their vehicles on a limo group with absolutely no other information, do you immediately call them up and ask for their business? I will assume (and hope!) the answer to that rhetorical question is no.

  It shouldn’t be any different than trying to connect with someone face to face. You state your name, what you do, and let them know it’s nice to meet them and you look forward to getting to know them better over coffee or a meal. As I’ve stated before in past columns, social media has made us lazy. All it takes is a push of a “request friend” button and, if the person on the other end accepts, it’s a done deal.

Typical users only spend about 17 minutes on LinkedIn per month…so be sure to establish a connection and move getting to know that person off the platform. (Source: Kinsta)

Typical users only spend about 17 minutes on LinkedIn per month…so be sure to establish a connection and move getting to know that person off the platform. (Source: Kinsta)

The innate simplicity of social media sites and apps says a lot about our society. I’m so grateful for services like Amazon Prime, Postmates, and, dare I say it, Uber Eats (don’t lie, you use it too). But I won’t pretend it hasn’t affected the way I interact (or don’t) with others.

You’re all in the business of making money. To do that, you must make genuine connections with not only your clients, but your peers as well. Therefore, I’m challenging you to clean up your friends list, starting with Facebook and LinkedIn. Look at a small chunk of the list every day and ask yourself these questions: 

  • Who is this person?
  • How did we meet?
  • Do their posts contribute to my understanding of how they run their business?
  • How does having me on their friends list benefit them?
  • How does having them on my friends list benefit me?

LinkedIn gains a new member every two seconds…that’s a lot of users, so stick with the ones you actually know. (Source: Tech Jury)

LinkedIn gains a new member every two seconds…that’s a lot of users, so stick with the ones you actually know. (Source: Tech Jury)

Any time you can’t answer these, delete that person. They won’t be heart broken, I promise. And neither will you. Because let’s be real: If you can’t answer these questions, you don’t really know this person. How can either of you benefit from the other if you don’t know and trust them? 

Related Topics: Facebook, Instagram, Lexi Tucker, LinkedIn, Millennials, networking, operations, social media, technology

Lexi Tucker Senior Editor
Comments ( 2 )
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  • Tammy

     | about 2 months ago

    This was right on point Lexi! Common courtesy goes a long way and we should be mindful in all interactions - especially social media to make a true connection. Thank you for the much needed reminder.

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