Operations

Glassdoor: How To Fix Your Desirability Problem

Lexi Tucker
Posted on March 22, 2018

As a Millennial, I can tell you Glassdoor is one of the first places we look to see if your company would be a good fit for us.
As a Millennial, I can tell you Glassdoor is one of the first places we look to see if your company would be a good fit for us.
Transparency rocks; it’s part of the reason I became a journalist. In 2018, people have more digital tools than ever before to research, provide input based on their individual experiences, and call others out on their BS. One of these tools is Glassdoor.

According to its website, “Glassdoor holds a growing database of millions of company reviews, CEO approval ratings, salary reports, interview reviews and questions, benefits reviews, office photos, and more. Unlike other jobs sites, all of this information is shared by those who know a company best — the employees.”

This can be both a blessing and a curse. On the one hand, you probably shouldn’t have to worry about bad reviews, since you run an exceptional business with an amazing company culture…right? On the other, you have to worry about any disgruntled ex (or even current) employee who may have a score to settle and decide to take it out on your company page.

Glassdoor has about 35 million reviews and insights for about 700,000 companies…is yours one of them? Source: Glassdoor Site Stats
Glassdoor has about 35 million reviews and insights for about 700,000 companies…is yours one of them? Source: Glassdoor Site Stats
Whether they are in the right or not is irrelevant; you need to focus on rectifying the situation as soon as you can. Some prime candidates will take one look at your 2.3 rating and skip right over your job postings. Here’s what you should do to ensure that doesn’t happen:

  1. Stop, Look, Listen

First, go to the site and look at your profile…assuming you have one, that is. If you don’t, you need to sign up and make it happen at www.glassdoor.com/employers. Claim and optimize your account. I won’t call anyone specific out, but I saw few industry companies with a rating higher than 4.0. Many had only one review.

Read your reviews. If there are too many negative reviews, you have to look at yourself as an employer and do some soul searching. Are these simply disgruntled employees who are looking for someone to take their frustration out on, or do you deserve to have this disappointment directed at you? Forbes writer Ryan Erskine makes my point for me: “Excellent Glassdoor reviews

Don’t just send a robotic response; reflect on what people have to say. Take the good and keep doing it — learn from the bad and change.
Don’t just send a robotic response; reflect on what people have to say. Take the good and keep doing it — learn from the bad and change.
start with being an excellent employer. No amount of online reputation management is going to convince unhappy employees to praise your company online.”

  1. Ask And You Will Receive (If You Deserve)

The next step is to start relying on your current star employees (you don’t want to risk it with former staff who were let go). Send out requests in small batches for them to submit a review of your company. Too many positive reviews on the same day will look suspicious to outsiders, so be sure to space out your requests. Explain why these reviews matter to you and your company and assure them the reviews remain anonymous.

  1. Respond Promptly

               

87% of Glassdoor users find the employer perspective useful when learning about jobs and companies. Source: Glassdoor.com U.S. Site Survey, August 2016
87% of Glassdoor users find the employer perspective useful when learning about jobs and companies. Source: Glassdoor.com U.S. Site Survey, August 2016
Like Yelp, Glassdoor enables employers to respond to all reviews. Don’t leave one unanswered, whether positive or negative. This shows readers you are active on the site and care what people have to say. Not responding could prove the reviewer right about your company. Foremost, make sure you consider the negative feedback and try your hardest to act on it. That way, you’ll likely be responding to more positive than negative reviews in the future.

LEXI TUCKER is LCT assistant editor and coordinator of the LCT Fast 40, a group of operators under 40 who collaborate and learn from each other about all aspects of chauffeured transportation. She can be reached at [email protected]

Related Topics: employee issues, employee management, employee recruitment, employee retention, hiring, How To, Millennial Matters, Millennials, online reviews, staff management

Lexi Tucker Associate Editor
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