Operations

Check Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself (Professionally)

Lexi Tucker
Posted on February 7, 2018

The share of employees who report being treated rudely by colleagues at least once a month has risen by 13% since 1998 (49% in 1998 and 62% in 2016).
The share of employees who report being treated rudely by colleagues at least once a month has risen by 13% since 1998 (49% in 1998 and 62% in 2016).
In the business of customer service, the client is king (or queen). As operators, you put up with even the most ridiculous requests just to ensure they will continue to call you instead of Uber or Lyft. You give them your undivided attention, always answer the phone with a smile, and stay patient even when they are riding your last nerve — so why don’t we give the people we work with the same respect?

It’s often said Millennials are the “me, me, me” or “I want it now” generation. Entitled, spoiled, selfish, socially inept…the list goes on. As I’ve said in previous columns, I definitely don’t deny this is common among people my age; hell, I’m guilty of it at times. Therefore, I felt it fitting for one of my first columns of the New Year to be focused on preventing such behavior — whether you’re 25 or 55. Here’s a checklist that will help ALL professionals reflect on what they can improve on in 2018:

Of nearly 800 managers and employees across 17 industries polled, 47% of those who were treated poorly deliberately decreased the time spent at work, and 38% said they intentionally decreased the quality of their work. 78% said their commitment to the organization had declined.
Of nearly 800 managers and employees across 17 industries polled, 47% of those who were treated poorly deliberately decreased the time spent at work, and 38% said they intentionally decreased the quality of their work. 78% said their commitment to the organization had declined.
Demanding instead of requesting

It’s really as simple as saying “please” and “thank you.” These two little phrases can make all the difference when you’re asking something of someone. It shouldn’t matter if you’re a manager or subordinate; being courteous applies to all. As operators, I know you’re busy and you may forget here and there. But remember: Without your office staff and chauffeurs, you wouldn’t be where you are today.

Acting arrogant instead of humble

Millennials tend to fall into this trap mentality of, “I have a college degree so I’m hot stuff.” Managers and owners default to the “I’m the boss, that’s why” or “my company, my rules,” answer. In the long run, we are all human. No one is better than anyone else simply because they’ve achieved something great. The name of the game in this industry is teamwork. The second people start thinking they are better than everyone else is the second you’ll see your company culture crumble.

Assuming instead of asking

80% lost work time worrying about the incident, and 63% lost work time in their effort to avoid the offender. Photo: Flickr/Alon
80% lost work time worrying about the incident, and 63% lost work time in their effort to avoid the offender. Photo: Flickr/Alon
There’s the old saying that when you assume, you make an ass out of “u” and me. When it comes to making a split second decision that could win you a contract, this might not be the case. Thinking like an owner the right way can be beneficial to everyone in the company and prevent people from feeling like they are being micromanaged. However, this doesn’t give you a license to do whatever you feel like whenever you feel like doing it. Don’t just assume your boss will be cool with you leaving an hour early to beat the traffic on your way to a concert; let them know a few weeks in advance so they can get someone to cover for you.

25% of those experiencing uncivil behavior admitted to taking their frustrations out on customers.All stats taken from McKinsey & Company study “The Hidden Toll of Workplace Incivility.”
25% of those experiencing uncivil behavior admitted to taking their frustrations out on customers.All stats taken from McKinsey & Company study “The Hidden Toll of Workplace Incivility.”
Talking instead of listening (or thinking)

Thinking before you say something is crucial if you want to avoid sounding ignorant. I do believe we live in a time where people are overly sensitive, but that doesn’t change the fact what you say in the heat of the moment can get you fired. You might not think it’s fair, but it’s the truth.

Interacting face to face instead of emailing or texting

Technology has made work (and life) easier and more convenient. But it does prevent people from getting to know one another on a deeply personal level. Instead, resolve to make use of it to invite that new coworker you see sitting alone at lunch to sit with you and your friends. Then put your phone in your pocket and start up a conversation. 

LEXI TUCKER is LCT assistant editor and coordinator of the LCT Fast 40, a group of operators under 40 who collaborate and learn from each other about all aspects of chauffeured transportation. She can be reached at [email protected]

Related Topics: better business management, business management, company culture, employee management, etiquette, Lexi Tucker, Millennial Matters, Millennials, staff management

Lexi Tucker Associate Editor
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