Operations

Why First Digital Impressions Count, Too

Lexi Tucker
Posted on January 8, 2018

If there’s one thing I’m passionate about, it’s grammar. Sadly, I’m sure if I had used “its” in that last sentence instead of “it’s,” quite a few people wouldn’t know the difference between the two. In no way am I insulting anyone’s intelligence; sometimes we don’t necessarily think before we type and miss it in a quick proofread.

At this year’s LCT East Show, I conducted a campfire session on email etiquette. It was a dream come true to be able to express the importance of proper grammar, spelling, and phrasing for this digital form of communication.

Online grammar checking tools like grammarly can help you out when you are short on time.
Online grammar checking tools like grammarly can help you out when you are short on time.
Many of your clients are CEOs, high-ranking government officials, and other well-educated members of society. It’s important to make the best possible impression on them, and you won’t do that by confusing the different forms of the word “there.”

If you couldn’t make it to the Show, I’ve condensed the lesson I presented into this list. If you have any questions on this subject, please email them to me ([email protected]). I’m super responsive (tip #9) and will make sure the font is easy to read (tip #6).

  1. Be sure the subject line makes it clear what the body of the email will contain.
  2. Address the recipient by Mr./Mrs./Ms. unless explicitly instructed otherwise.
  3. Ensure the spelling of their name is correct before hitting send.
  4. Know the difference between often misused forms of the same word:

Remember the three golden C’s: Be clear, concise, and courteous.
Remember the three golden C’s: Be clear, concise, and courteous.
Their – Possessive, belonging to someone; “their car”

There – Location; “over there”

They’re – Contraction meaning “they are”

Its – Possessive, belonging to something; “its instruction booklet”

 It’s – Contraction meaning “It is”

Your – Possessive, belonging to someone; “your car”

You’re – Contraction meaning “you are”

To – Preposition, expressing motion in the direction of; “send the bill to my admin”

The worst thing you can do is accidentally send an email to someone who wasn’t meant to see it. ALWAYS double check you’ve selected the correct recipient in the “To” line. Don’t slip up!
The worst thing you can do is accidentally send an email to someone who wasn’t meant to see it. ALWAYS double check you’ve selected the correct recipient in the “To” line. Don’t slip up!
Too — Adverb, in addition to; “he’s coming too”

  1. Don’t use shortcuts often seen in text messages. For example: “Can u plz call me b4 you decide 2 use another company?” would be unacceptable.
  2. Don’t use a crazy font in irregular colors. It’s usually best to stick with Arial or Times New Roman, size 12, black font.
  3. If you are attaching documents, make sure their names clearly reflect their contents.
  4. Keep it short; if it takes you longer than five minutes to write an email, it’s probably best to call the person instead.
  5. Try your best to respond within as short a time span as possible; if you cannot immediately answer the question, at least acknowledge you are working on the request ASAP. If you will be out of the office, make sure to include contact information of someone who will be available in your auto-response.
  6. Read the email at least twice before sending to check for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.
  7. Make sure your email address has your name and your company’s name in it like [email protected] Something like [email protected] doesn’t tell the reader anything and can easily be mistaken for spam.
  8. Most importantly, YOUR EMAIL REFLECTS WHO YOU ARE. It doesn’t matter if you’re responding to a question, compliment, or complaint. Remember emails can easily be copy-pasted and put on social media for the world to see.

As you type, ask yourself: Does this make sense? Are there typos? Am I clearly conveying my point?
As you type, ask yourself: Does this make sense? Are there typos? Am I clearly conveying my point?
LEXI TUCKER is LCT assistant editor and coordinator of the LCT Fast 40, a group of operators under 40 who collaborate and learn from each other about all aspects of chauffeured transportation. She can be reached at [email protected]

Related Topics: communications, customer service, How To, Lexi Tucker, Millennial Matters, social media

Lexi Tucker Associate Editor
Comments ( 1 )
  • john michael

     | about 8 months ago

    Great subject, often overlooked by a lot of people. Keep up the great writing.

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