Operations

Doing The Job Hop: Why Millennials Leave

Lexi Tucker
Posted on December 5, 2017

I recently talked with someone in the industry who said they were impressed with how long I’ve stayed with LCT (it’ll be two years on Jan.19). It didn’t shock me to receive such a comment. Millennials, after all, never stay in one position for very long…right? Well, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, we aren’t job hopping any faster than Generation X did.

A Forbes article by Sarah Landrum breaks down the data: “When you compare people ages 18 to 35 from February 2016 (Millennials) and February 2000 (Gen X), you find both groups report a similar tenure with their current employer: About 13 months. Things get even more interesting when you compare folks who’ve been with their employer for five years or more — the figures stand at 22% for Millennials and 21.8% for Gen X. Things are pretty close here, too, but Millennials have a slight edge over their forebears.”

More than 60% of Millennials said they plan to stay in their jobs for some time. However, over 25% admitted they often thought about quitting their jobs.Source: Boston College
More than 60% of Millennials said they plan to stay in their jobs for some time. However, over 25% admitted they often thought about quitting their jobs.Source: Boston College
Interesting — it appears generalizations about my generation are wrong once again. But that’s not to say stereotypes never carry a grain of truth. After all, they can be informed by an individual’s experiences. If you’re an operator who has recently lost a top performing Millennial and are scratching your head, here are a few thoughts from members of the Fast 40 Facebook group as to why they may be leaving:

Chelsea Candeub, Park Avenue Limousine, Trevose, Pa.: Millennials are looking for a better salary/higher position at a different company.

29% of Millennials are engaged at work, 16% are actively disengaged, 55% are not engaged. Source: Gallup
29% of Millennials are engaged at work, 16% are actively disengaged, 55% are not engaged. Source: Gallup
Anton Kirichenko, Motor City Limousine, Detroit, Mich.: I agree with Chelsea. I think the chance of getting a raise is what makes one abandon an old job for a new one. I don’t like to be a stepping stone for someone, and therefore I usually don’t hire job hoppers. All you have to do is look at the applicant’s resume to figure it out.

Mike Campbell, Grace Limousine, Manchester, N.H.: Simple. Loyalty doesn’t matter as much as it used to: In relationships, the workplace, or anywhere else. Second, instant gratification trumps long-term goals and satisfaction. If they experience momentary dissatisfaction with their current job, rather than work it out, they look to move on to something new where they can start fresh and feel special again. I think the lack of social and conversational skills among many Millennials also leads them to feel as though they can’t simply resolve issues at their current job, so they just look elsewhere instead.

Mike Barreto, Eagle Chauffeured Services, Brookhaven, Pa.: Millennials are trendy butterflies who never feed on one specific flower for long. As soon as they see their fellow butterflies migrate to other pastures, they are very likely to follow!

Top reasons why Millennials consider leaving their jobs: To make more money, to move forward in their careers, to pursue work more aligned with their passions, and to have more flexibility/better work-life balance. Source: Boston College
Top reasons why Millennials consider leaving their jobs: To make more money, to move forward in their careers, to pursue work more aligned with their passions, and to have more flexibility/better work-life balance. Source: Boston College
While these answers aren’t wrong, here’s what I believe: Millennials want to be treated fairly. We are young, and life is too short to be sitting at a desk day in and day out performing tasks that make no real difference in the grand scheme of things. We have potential, are more educated than previous generations, and want to be seen as a valuable part of the company we work for. I’d argue this isn’t too far from how other generations feel about what they do, whether they are 25 or 55. The reason we leave boils down to this: Are we making a decent living doing something that matters?

Engaged Millennials are 64% less likely to say they will switch jobs if the job market improves in the next 12 months. Source: Gallup
Engaged Millennials are 64% less likely to say they will switch jobs if the job market improves in the next 12 months. Source: Gallup
Chauffeured transportation companies make a difference in the lives of many. Without them, people would miss flights, meetings, and valuable vacation time with their loved ones. And it’s all done with the highest standards of safety, courtesy, and customer service.

Do your employees see it this way? More importantly, are you treating the lives of your staff with the same importance as your clients?

LEXI TUCKER is LCT assistant editor and coordinator of the LCT Fast 40, a group of operators under 40 who collaborate and learn from each other about all aspects of chauffeured transportation. She can be reached at [email protected]

Related Topics: employee benefits, employee perks, employee recruitment, employee retention, hiring, human resources, LCTFast40, Millennial Matters, Millennials

Lexi Tucker Assistant Editor
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