Operations

How To Find A Digital Mentor

Lexi Tucker
Posted on October 7, 2016

If you’re a member of the LCT Fast 40 group of operators, you’re probably looking at our technology coverage with glee and confidence. On the other hand, if you’re a member of the more seasoned crowd, you likely greeted this first part with skepticism, and maybe some concern.

I’ll share an embarrassing secret: the LCT editorial team recently participated in a demo with one of these software companies, and I’m not ashamed to say I had a difficult time following. As a Millennial, I’m adept at adapting to new technologies. But this experience made me realize why some operators hesitate.

I think something people have even more difficulty with than technology is learning it’s O.K. to ask for help. The primary mission of the LCT Fast 40 is to encourage the limousine industry to evolve with the times through innovative practices, tech adoption, and refreshed perspectives. But that’s not just meant to stay among younger operators.

When people choose to pursue a career in luxury ground transportation, I assume it’s because they enjoy providing top-tier customer service and have an honest desire to serve others. This idea of the “servant’s heart” got me thinking: If operators and chauffeurs find true joy in helping customers, why don’t they apply it to their fellow industry members?

It’s probably safe to say everyone has had a mentor at one point in their careers who guided them to where they are today. This is a busy industry, and many operators don’t have much time to devote to other people. However, digital mentorship will provide both parties with benefits and make it easier to learn about evolving programs and software.

Use Your Resources

The first step is to connect with operators who already use the same software as you (or as you plan to). One of the best places to find a potential mentor is through limo groups on Facebook. Don’t be afraid to post your concerns, and don’t worry about whether or not your questions are “stupid.” The only dumb question is the one not asked.

These groups exist to support and encourage members of the industry. We should be building each other up, not tearing each other down. Another fantastic way to find someone willing to help is at trade show networking events or local association meetings.

On the flip side, if someone asks you to mentor them, remember you have struggled at one point as well. Before you say you aren’t interested, consider the benefits that come with sharing your knowledge: Development of management and leadership qualities, gaining a potential new affiliate, and increasing your recognition within the industry through word of mouth.

Patience Is Key

With technology, patience (and practice) makes you better. This goes for the mentor and the mentee. Getting upset because someone needs to see how you dispatched that vehicle three times is not going to help the situation. In turn, getting angry and frustrated because you need the direction repeated will only blind you further. When both parties get mad at one another, the relationship falls apart.

Support One Another

Mentors should remember to praise their mentees strengths and celebrate progress. Mentees should appreciate the time and effort their mentors put in to help. Both should listen to each other’s concerns and respond in a respectful manner. The mentor isn’t any better than the mentee; they are a team.

Once the mentee feels comfortable enough, it is time for them to become a mentor and pay it forward.

LEXI TUCKER is LCT assistant editor and coordinator of the LCT Fast 40, a group of operators under 40 who collaborate and learn from each other about all aspects of chauffeured transportation. She can be reached at [email protected]

Related Topics: continuing education, Facebook, industry education, LCTFast40, Lexi Tucker, Millennial Matters, Millennials, mobile technology, social media

Lexi Tucker Associate Editor
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