Vehicles

Publisher's Page: New Model Limousines Push Coachbuilder Creativity to the Extreme

Sara Eastwood-McLean
Posted on February 1, 1997

Not so long ago, if you owned a super stretch limousine, you had something unique, which made you stand out among your competitors.  You could offer your customers something no one else could.

Today, over 50 percent of the limousines operators nationwide have at least one 120-inch super stretch in their fleet.  Needless to say it has become difficult to be original.  Unfortunately, sometimes that’s precisely what we need to close the sale.  It’s called a “hook.”

In this issue, L&C’s 1997 new model issue, you’ll see how the limousine manufacturing side of the industry answered the call for product differentiation.  The spring lineup marks a true milestone for design inventiveness.  In fact, this year will undoubtedly to down in history as being one of our most significant times – the year of unleashing the imagination.

While there are no plans to take limousines to longer lengths, distinctions between products will be more obvious today than ever before as coachbuilders push creativity to the extreme.  How about a limousine with a seamless window that stretches the side length of the vehicle?  Incredible.

Whether your customer base comes from corporate work or you cater to weekend business, you are going to go crazy over the new interior designs and outside appointments.

Virtually every coachbuilder has dreamed up a new name to match their limousine’s personality as well.  There’s the Casino, the Cosmo, the “Z”, the Wave, and the Fantasy, just to name a few.

From a sales standpoint, this is great news for limousine operators.  For a small incremental investment, you’ll have more limousine options than you’ll know what to do with.

It’s fairly straightforward.  If you want to draw attention to yourself, you do your best to stand out.  If you want to catch more fish, put out more “hooks.”

Take a good look at this year’s 1997 model lineup.  Thanks to the talented production teams at the limousines manufacturing level who’ve awakened our senses, the “cookie cutter” look is out.  This will help operators secure better hourly rates and acquire less low bid business, which should help to make 1997 a healthy sales year.

 

 

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