Operations

Publisher's Page: The ‘Traveler I.D. Card’

Sara Eastwood
Posted on July 1, 2004

In February of this year, the National Business Travel Association announced its support of the Aviation Security Technical Corrections and Improvement Act, which requires the Transportation Security Administration to develop a trusted traveler program within one year.

A Traveler I.D. Card would allow law-abiding U.S. citizens who travel frequently to become trusted travelers and be subjected to less rigorous screening procedures than other passengers. The card would contain basic information about the holder and would be linked to a federal database containing detailed personal data. Passengers would show the card at airports, and would have their thumbs scanned by a digital reader to verify identity before boarding a plane.

The program would allow airport security and law enforcement personnel to focus their attention and resources on passengers who pose a legitimate hijacking threat, and would help the TSA achieve its stated goal of screening passengers and baggage with passenger delays no greater than 10 minutes. This process would improve security and ease the burden for the frequent traveler.

While there is still debate over who would pay for this, support for such a program is gaining momentum. This is exciting news for us. While the economy rebounds, airlines are still reluctant to de-furlough airplanes. Thus, airport delays due to security screening measures will continue to be a major industry burden for travelers – and anything that impacts our clients affects us. There are more than six million frequent business travelers nationwide. If we can get this core market segment believing that business travel can be efficient, there will be more trips made.

There are definite synergies in cultivating a working relationship with other associations involved in travel such as ours. This particular issue is one that the National Limousine Association would be wise to collaborate with the NBTA on.

As for our 2004 Largest Fleets issue, I’d like to direct your attention to some significant changes we made this year. For the first time ever, we’ve consolidated all national-based companies and have done away with breaking the listings down by marketplace. We rolled out the Top 10s section that is a collection of best practices. We added

LCT’s Best Services list that is simply a chronicle of all Operator of the Year winners since the program’s inception in 1990. Finally, our team also put it all on the line and selected the industry’s Most Influential, Most Newsworthy, Most Innovative and Fastest Growing/Most Profitable.

We believe you’ll find this issue worthwhile reading and we anticipate much “discussion” will ensue in the coming months. Please don’t hesitate to e-mail us if you have any questions, comments or concerns.

 

Related Topics: airport rules, National Business Travel Association

Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Article

Meet The New Round Of Up And Comers

DEC. LCT: 2017 LCT COOL PLANET: The diverse operators and trend setters all have one thing in common: Nothing’s cooler than earning, learning, and living life in this industry.