Operations

How To Serve Up The Right Limo Wine

Jim Luff
Posted on September 8, 2014

Why Wine & Limos?
From California to Texas and on to New York, wineries and so-called “wine country” areas have sprouted across America. While France and Italy have long held the record for producing the greatest wines and most volume, the United States holds the fourth position in the world in producing wine. The 2004 Oscar and Golden Globe winning movie, Sideways, helped push wine into our lives as a sophisticated beverage.

Private Label Wine With Your Logo
Did you know you can place your own personalized label on a bottle of wine? There are many companies online that will place your label, logo and message on a bottle of wine for as low as $14 a bottle (windsorvineyards.com). While that might seem cheap, some of the best bottles of wine can be found in this price range. If you want to go a little higher end, personalwine.com has an excellent selection of well-known wines such as Jordan Vineyards in Alexander Valley that can be relabeled with your logo. You know that your $70 bottle of wine will be an absolute hit if it is a Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon. Windsor also carries an Alexander Valley cabernet for $30.

How Do I Get Started?
You can visit one of many websites online to begin shopping. Search the Internet for “personalized wines” and you will find hundreds (see chart) of different companies that sell wine and champagne that can be customized with your logo, wording and fonts added. Most sites use technology that allows you to see a preview of your label. You check out with a credit card and in two to four weeks your wine will arrive. While some sites will allow you to buy single bottles, most require a minimum of 12 bottles (a case) and offer discounts for larger quantities. Cases start at about $200 and go up from there depending on the wine in the bottle. Almost all sites offer the label for free with the purchase of the wine, and there is no setup fee or other fees if you find the right one.

Success Stories
Ron Stein, owner of Exclusive Sedan Service in North Hollywood, Calif., has had so much success in using wine as client gifts that he regularly places orders for 40 cases at a time. Buying in this quantity and shopping for close-outs from wineries going out of business, Stein has been able to bring his costs down to about $12 a bottle. “I’m not going to give bad wine as a gift to my clients, so the wine has to be an excellent bottle,” he says. Many people keep the bottle in their collections as a keepsake rather than drinking the wine, and his company name remains on their minds every time they select a bottle of wine from their racks, he adds. “They always remember being appreciated,” he says. It’s a meager investment with big top-of-mind awareness results. Insurance agent Carol Bean also gives personalized bottles of wine to her clients for birthday, anniversary and holiday gifts. “People talk about that gift long after it has been given,” Bean says. It is a small investment in memories that will outlast those of other premium gifts given to clients.

Where To Go For Wine

www.personalizeyourwine.com
www.northwestcellars.com
www.windsorvineyards.com
www.customwinesource.com
www.personalwine.com

Related Topics: business management, client gifts, customer service, innovative marketing, New Operator, VIP service, wine tours

Jim Luff Contributing Editor
Comments ( 0 )
More Stories
Article

How To Get Clients To See Value In Your Rates

NOV. LCT: We fear our own prices when comparing ourselves to TNCs, but we don’t compete with them any more than Marriott does with a Motel 6. Learn how to justify your rates without guilt.

News

2018's Luxury Travel Trends

Among the highlights for next year is a focus on far-flung destinations along with international trips of two weeks or more.

Article

The Art Of Sales

NOV. LCT: In the battle to obtain new clients and retain loyal ones, only those who know the best ways to reach, connect with, and educate them will survive.

Article

How To Handle Conflicts Of Interest

NOV. LCT: Forming relationships with your customers is a vital part of retaining them. But how do you ensure you and your employees never cross the line of professionalism?