Regulations

Limo Associations Moving Forward At Full Throttle

Tom Halligan
Posted on July 15, 2014
Tim Rose, (L), received a plaque acknowledging his successful 14-years as president of LANJ. Rose, owner of Flyte Tyme Limousine, stepped down in January, ceding the presidency to Vice President Jim Moseley, owner of Trip Tracker.

Tim Rose, (L), received a plaque acknowledging his successful 14-years as president of LANJ. Rose, owner of Flyte Tyme Limousine, stepped down in January, ceding the presidency to Vice President Jim Moseley, owner of Trip Tracker.

Tim Rose, (L), received a plaque acknowledging his successful 14-years as president of LANJ. Rose, owner of Flyte Tyme Limousine, stepped down in January, ceding the presidency to Vice President Jim Moseley, owner of Trip Tracker.
Tim Rose, (L), received a plaque acknowledging his successful 14-years as president of LANJ. Rose, owner of Flyte Tyme Limousine, stepped down in January, ceding the presidency to Vice President Jim Moseley, owner of Trip Tracker.

It’s been a hectic past couple of months on the road covering association and industry events. In May, I went to my first annual LCT Leadership Summit held in Miami Beach, and the day after attended the monthly meeting of the Florida Limousine Association (FLA).

Soon, I was off to Chicago to speak at the annual Illinois Limousine Association’s (ILA) annual meeting, and days later headed to New York for the Long Island Limousine Association’s meeting. As I write this, I’m preparing to head south to Washington, D.C. to attend some of the National Limousine Association’s annual Day on the Hill events, where association members confer with their home state Congressional leaders on local and national industry issues.

In addition, my colleague Steve Mullen attended the Limousine Associations of New Jersey (LANJ) which held its annual membership meeting and auction, raising $15,775 to fund various association causes that serve the interest of Garden State operators. The auction — which included several items donated by LCT — is a highlight of the annual event attended by more than 75 members and sponsors. Complete fleet/maplecrest has sponsored the event for the past 13 years and in that time has helped to raise more than $120,000 for LANJ. Co-sponsors also included Ford Lincoln/Ford Motor Company, Chosen Payments and Grech Motors.

New Jersey operator Tim Rose received a plaque recognizing his 14 years as president of LANJ. Rose, owner of Flyte Tyme Limousine, stepped down in January, succeeded by Vice President Jim Moseley, owner of TripTracker.

Commenting on her first meeting back in the industry as the newly appointed executive director of LANJ, Patricia Nelson said, “I felt like I never left and it’s great to see so many people turn out for the event supporting LANJ and raising more than $15,000.” Nelson, of course, served as NLA executive director from 2006 to 2012.

Speaking of raising money, while attending the FLA meeting in Ft. Lauderdale, the Greater Orlando Limousine Association (GOLA) in a gesture of solidarity contributed $3,500 to the FLA to support its lobbying efforts on behalf of operators to ensure the aggressive transportation network companies (TNCs) operate legally throughout the state.

“The entire industry needs to work together to stop illegal companies from operating in our space,” FLA President Rick Versace said. “No matter how great the technology, if these companies use vehicles that are not registered and not insured properly, then they are putting the riding public in danger and should either come into compliance or be closed down.”

Florida Limousine Association President Rick Versace (L) accepts a $3,500 check from Greater Orlando Limousine Association President Cliff Wright, who presented it on behalf of GOLA members to help the FLA in its lobbying efforts to regulate TNCs.
Florida Limousine Association President Rick Versace (L) accepts a $3,500 check from Greater Orlando Limousine Association President Cliff Wright, who presented it on behalf of GOLA members to help the FLA in its lobbying efforts to regulate TNCs.
GOLA President Cliff Wright said lobbying costs are expensive, and his group has sent members to the state capitol in Tallahassee to join FLA lobbying efforts. “We have sent four delegates (Gregg Moulton, vice president; Albert Castagna, secretary; Ashraf Elmahdi, board member; and Cliff Wright, president) to Tallahassee several times to do our part to support the FLA,” Wright said. “The GOLA board and all of our members voted unanimously to help the FLA.”

Driving from New jersey to Long Island to attend the LILA meeting via the infamous Long Island Expressway is always a white knuckle experience. But once there, LILA President Robert Cunningham was a great host who offered a fine dinner and no doubt booked the most interesting venue for an association meeting — the Race Palace, a Las Vegas style OTB where you can win a few bucks betting on the ponies.

Speaking of winning, a representative from the Suffolk County Department of Labor updated members on the new Taxi and Limousine Commission scheduled to start this month. The TLC will have authority to license limousine companies in the county, and because of regional reciprocity agreements, will allow operators to do business legally throughout the tri-state region.

LILA supported establishing the TLC, and members applauded the new agency. The TLC will operate under New York’s “Code 498” that regulates interjurisdictional pre-arranged for-hire vehicles, giving Suffolk County operators the ability to do business by having just one license instead of the status quo where operators need multiple licenses to do business throughout the state.

Related Topics: Cliff Wright, Florida operators, Greater Orlando Limousine Association, Illinois Limousine Association, Jim Moseley, LILA, limo associations, long island limousine association, New Jersey operators, New York operators, Patricia Nelson, robert cunningham, Tim Rose

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