Operations

What Does Your Business Card (Really) Say?

Posted on February 18, 2016 by - Also by this author

Simplicity reigns for business cards. The key is to be concise, yet creative. Most importantly, list your town and state. That’s important for affiliates, and in the experience of LCT editors, vital to getting called for an article or comment, since many LCT content decisions factor in geographic diversity. Also, avoid strange sized or outsized buisiness cards that may not fit into standard business card holders or plastic card pages.
Simplicity reigns for business cards. The key is to be concise, yet creative. Most importantly, list your town and state. That’s important for affiliates, and in the experience of LCT editors, vital to getting called for an article or comment, since many LCT content decisions factor in geographic diversity. Also, avoid strange sized or outsized buisiness cards that may not fit into standard business card holders or plastic card pages.
Business card exchanges are probably the most common form of repetitive marketing your company engages in, especially at industry functions like this month’s International LCT Show in Las Vegas.

Your business card should contain all the necessary information needed to contact you without being too busy or simplistic. Since minimum quantities are usually 1,000 cards, get the most from them.

Where Are You?

The most common mistake in designing a business card is failing to include your service area, says Arthur Messina, founder and president of Create-a-Card in St. James, N.Y., a limousine industry marketing vendor. 

“While it might be okay for distribution in your hometown, it’s not advisable for handing out at industry trade shows if you want people to remember where you are from,” Messina says. In these examples, the cards are clean and simple, but don’t indicate where these companies might be located except for the area code in the phone number. An area code could easily cover an area much larger than the operator’s service area.

What Do You Do?

A common inclusion on industry business cards is a list of services provided. Since we are in the passenger transportation business, it is fair to assume we will drive anyone for any occasion. Do we really need to tell people we provide wedding service? Terms such as “jackpot trips” or “ferries” might be unique to a geographic area, and are not understood by affiliates in other regions. Consider providing more pertinent information in place of services offered.

Airports Served

Including airports you serve can easily help narrow down what region your company covers while also indicating you possess legal authority to do business at a specific airport. Adding the type of vehicles you operate further clarifies the services you are able to provide without an unnecessary phone inquiry about that 20-passenger Hummer you don’t have. Adding your photo to your business card can immediately put a face to your name, especially at trade shows were attendees come back with stacks of cards. “Adding a photo of yourself is great for helping people remember you,” says Messina says, who does that on his cards.

Functional

Include a panel for the chauffeur to write-in their name and cell number, and have them give it to clients during an assignment. This can save on the cost of ordering business cards for every chauffeur and risk them quitting before you can distribute the cards. You can save even more money by purchasing these in larger quantities, since they can be used indefinitely.

Simple & Basic

Simple business cards with basic information rule. By listing your business name, personal name and basic contact information, you captivate the attention of the reader with minimal distraction. You certainly can’t get lost looking at a simple black-and-white card. However, you need to be confident that people receiving your card know exactly what business you are in if you don’t include further information.

Flashy & Glitzy

Professional business card designers such as Create-A-Card use an array of color, photos and symbols to create informative, eye-popping cards with information such as “credit cards accepted” and what social media sites you belong to.

This is vital to Millennials (born 1982-1999) who use social media as a way of life and doing business. Jennifer Paris of Paris Limousine in Oklahoma City, Okla., has an attractive card simulating an i-phone screen combining her photo, social media handles and contact information. The card uses brilliant colors with a distinct style. Such designs are likely to be kept forever and even shown to other people.

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