Operations

Climbing Chargeback Mountain

Posted on July 20, 2013 by

Page 1 of 2

When your customers book a limo, make sure they’re not trying to squeeze out of paying by ordering a credit card chargeback.

Credit card chargebacks sometimes can seem like a minor nuisance, but if left unchecked, they can turn into a real fiasco. “You have to respond no matter what,” says Olya Mesheryakova of Century Business Solutions, an experienced credit card processor for the limousine industry. Not responding properly to chargebacks can jeopardize your merchant account and keep you from effectively fighting chargebacks in the future.

When a chargeback occurs, the customer contacts their credit card company to say they do not want to pay the amount that has been charged to their credit card. In the limousine industry, common situations include a customer who cancels at the last minute disputes the nun-refundable deposit; a customer is not happy with the service and does not want to pay; or the customer is being charged an overtime fee for the vehicle that he or she disputes.

In any case, once the chargeback has been issued, the money is removed from the operator’s account and the credit card processor steps in to help mediate between the operator and the disputing customer’s bank and credit card holder.

Chargeback Defense

Since much of the credit card transactions in the chauffeured transportation industry are non-qualified, meaning the credit card is not present to be swiped, it can be a little tougher for operators to fight back.

Qualified chargebacks typically have a client’s signature next to the final amount charged, so a dispute is easily countered by showing this evidence that the client was fully aware of the charge taking place.

A non-qualified transaction happens when the credit card is charged by manually keying in the credit card number and billing information. This is how most limo operations run, and because it does not require a signature before purchase, operators can use extra methods to protect themselves from chargebacks.

Olya Mesheryakova of Century Business Solutions, an industry credit card processor, says operators must respond to chargebacks no matter how unpleasant or time-consuming the process.
Olya Mesheryakova of Century Business Solutions, an industry credit card processor, says operators must respond to chargebacks no matter how unpleasant or time-consuming the process.

One of the most important steps you can take is to make sure you have a document with a signature from the client that clearly states the items for which the customer is being charged. An example of this would be in a digital or printed trip ticket that the customer signs when leaving the vehicle. If it is a corporate account, you reference the signed credit card authorization form that gives you permission to bill the company’s listed credit card.

These documents will show you had agreement from the customer at the time of purchase for the charge. If a customer wants to dispute the quality of service or overtime, you must procure documents to show that the service was delivered well and in a timely manner. In this case you can use records such as a vehicle GPS log showing what time the car arrived at the final destination or a fuel receipt near the drop off at the agreed upon time — anything you can do to state your case.

It also helps to take the initiative and contact the upset customer and see if you can work something out without having to go through the chargeback process. Maybe you can make a concession and turn a customer’s negative view toward your company into a positive one. It will depend on each case.

Watching Out for Fraud

Although most chargebacks will likely come from misunderstandings or difficult customers, there are some unfortunate cases in which a customer is trying to pull one over on you. A sneaky example can be a teenager who books a reservation on a debit card knowing that it is still legal to do so, but much more difficult to fight against over a chargeback. (That is why it’s always best to have a parent be the legal representative on a booking).

Also, criminals can book the reservation on a card, and then use a different, or stolen, card on the night of the event. If the chauffeur doesn’t check that the cards match, they can argue they never took the ride and have a case for a chargeback. Given the lack of physical evidence to show who really rode in the car, it can be difficult to prove.

Some ways to prevent this include copies of driver’s license and credit cards that can be faxed to you, and making sure that your team knows how to properly catalog the transaction and complete the service so they will have everything on record if a chargeback occurs.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Tech Entrepreneur Puts Limo Company Up For Sale

The Southern California operation comes with a prestigious list of VIP, celebrity, and corporate clients.

Company Fined For Trading Discounts For Good Reviews

More than 500 people wrote nearly 700 reviews on Yelp and Google, as well as on the company's app pages.

If You Want More Affiliates, Form Relationships First

South Carolina operator Ashley Richey believes you must build a stellar reputation before asking to affiliate with another company.

Ten Tips For Marketing In The Digital Age

From understanding your target audience to retaining customers, here are some helpful online strategies. 

Company Accused Of Ditching Couples At The Altar

One client says once the deposits were collected, the Cleveland-based business stopped responding to their calls and emails.

See More News

Facebook Comments ()

Comments (0)

Post a Comment

Submit

Blogs

See More

See More

See More

See More

LCT Store

LCT Magazine - December 2016 $12.95 GLOBAL/INTERNATIONAL ISSUE COVER STORY: * The Coolest Operators on the Planet * *
LCT Magazine - November 2016 $12.95 COVER STORY: * iCARS Creates a New Model Of Limo Service * *



Connect

Experience the three annual industry events for networking for business, showcasing vehicles and products, and getting the tools for success.

Read About Your Region

What’s Happening Near You?
Click on any state to see the latest industry news and events in that region.

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Metro Magazine

Serving the bus and passenger rail industries for more than a century

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

Please sign in or register to .    Close