Where Is My Passenger?

Posted on December 31, 2015 by - Also by this author

Remember, even the liveliest passengers can go horizontal. Never assume they won't wake up and exit during a pit stop. Chauffeurs should regularly check everyone is on board after a pit stop. 
Remember, even the liveliest passengers can go horizontal. Never assume they won't wake up and exit during a pit stop. Chauffeurs should regularly check everyone is on board after a pit stop. 
In our business, we spend a lot of time looking for passengers. Whether it’s the baggage claim area of an airport, the lobby of a hotel, hospital or restaurant, we are always trying to connect with passengers.

The most common connection problems occur at large airports. While having chauffeurs text their clients on arrival at airports has vastly helped making connections, it’s still not foolproof since the passenger and chauffeur don’t know what the other looks like.

But that’s not what this blog is about. This blog post centers on major chauffeur blunders in losing their passengers. In the most recent case, one of my chauffeurs was dispatched to a local residence on Beech Street to take a group of people to a restaurant in the quaint town of Visalia, Calif, about 65 miles north of my city. Visalia also has a Beech Street. My dispatchers wondered why the chauffeur left the yard nearly two hours before pickup, a procedural no-no. Alas, the chauffeur would call in by radio to say he was unable to locate the house numbers on Beech Street to pick up his passengers. Two dispatchers scrambled to assist him. As a cross street location was obtained from the lost chauffeur, an observant dispatcher realized the chauffeur was already in Visalia WITHOUT his passengers. As luck would have it, we had another vehicle complete a job 20 minutes before pickup time, so the client never knew the chauffeur who picked them up was not the originally assigned chauffeur.

That doesn’t top the chauffeur who was sent to Redding, Calif., in a stretch to fetch a doctor late at night. The 8-hour trip became a little longer for the doctor and the chauffeur through an honest mistake. At about 2 a.m., the chauffeur stopped to refuel. The doctor was in the back of the car presumably sleeping. The chauffeur went inside to buy a soda, use the restroom and grab a smoke break.

As he puffed away on the side of the building, the doctor woke up and slipped inside to use the restroom, unseen by the chauffeur. You see it coming? The chauffeur finished his smoke, put the gas hose back in the pump, and jumped into the car to continue the journey home. The doctor came out and found his limousine gone! He didn’t know what limo company his assistant used so he had to call her first as the limo barreled down Interstate 5 with only the chauffeur in the vehicle. The assistant called the limo company and informed the dispatcher of her boss’s plight. The dispatcher called the chauffeur who by now was 20 miles down the road. The chauffeur argued that his passenger is asleep in the back before finally having the nerve to drop the partition only to find out his passenger was missing. Meanwhile, the doctor spent about 45 minutes in the parking lot of a gas station. It was a humbling experience for both parties.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More Shop Talk Blog Posts

September 21, 2016

When Marriage Proposals Go Wrong In The Limo: Part 2

Limousines might be good for weddings, but prove troublesome for popping the question.

September 21, 2016

Safety Tips For Driving In High Winds

Driving Gem: Do you know the size of your vehicle's sail area?

September 14, 2016

When Marriage Proposals Go Wrong In The Limo

Mini-Series Part 1: A trailer park, curses, a tumbler of vodka, and a pack of beauties. Could anything go right about this trip?

September 14, 2016

Detecting An Alternator Failure

Your fleet vehicle electrical systems depend on optimally running alternators. When an alternator fails, you'll be left on the side of the road.

September 12, 2016

A Horrible Experience As A Mystery Rider

A dangerous five-point U-turn, lack of local knowledge, and requests for directions ruined an evening limo run.

See More

Facebook Comments ()

Comments (0)

Post a Comment

Submit

Blogs

See More

See More

See More

See More

LCT Store

LCT Magazine - September 2016 $12.95 COVER STORY: * How Do We Max Our Markets? * *
LCT Magazine - August 2016 $12.95 COVER STORY: * Stay in the Black Despite Insurance Blues * *



Connect

Experience the three annual industry events for networking for business, showcasing vehicles and products, and getting the tools for success.

Read About Your Region

What’s Happening Near You?
Click on any state to see the latest industry news and events in that region.

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Metro Magazine

Serving the bus and passenger rail industries for more than a century

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

Please sign in or register to .    Close